Christmas Traditions

Recently I've wondered if our adult children have endured our Christmas tradition of pudding making either out of respect for us or because they're hoping to stay in our good books in case we finally get it right this year and give them the presents they've been hoping for. (Not really. I don't think any of them are that mercenary and in fact, finding out what they do want for Christmas is worse than pulling teeth.)

It was encouraging then when Son#4 questioned a few days ago when we would be doing Christmas puddings as he only had the one weekend free before Christmas. But what was even more encouraging - and exciting - was when the family arrived to help with the Christmas puddings. The Most Adorable Granddaughter#2 walked into my kitchen and waited quietly (unusual!) until she gained my attention, and then, in a restrained yet excited manner, told me, "We're helping you make Christmas puddings like we did last year."

Her older sister (The Most Adorable Granddaughter#1) picked up the mixed peel and told her, "You used to eat this as a baby." (True. Check out the pictures here for proof.) "Yes," she breathed, almost reverently.






And so once again we got to enjoy the mess and the chaos that is Christmas pudding making in our home.


  
  




 



 
  
  
  

If that wasn't enough, we also decorated Christmas baubles with glitter once the puddings were bubbling away on the stove. This early childhood teacher had the brilliant idea that the grandchildren could write their names and the year (or their parents could) in PVA glue on the balls and then sprinkle glitter onto the glue. A test run by yours truly revealed that the glue would drip and ruin the lettering before the glitter was added so we ended up going with just decorating. It took a home-schooling mum to suggest that newspaper under the glitter might protect the table from all the glue drips. (It's obvious we have a wonderful cleaner at work who doesn't complain in the least when we leave such messes for her to clean up on a regular basis since I wasn't the one who thought of this small and effective trick. Duh!)





While I cleaned up the glitter from off the table, the chairs, my kitchen benches, and wherever else it managed to adhere itself, DH cooked a barbecue tea. This worked so well that I think the decorating and the barbecue are going to have to be included in our pudding making tradition from now on. And since Son#3 and his lovely wife were unable to be with us, The Most Adorable Granddaughters made sure they won't feel too left out by making them some decorations for what will most likely be their first tree.

If you enjoyed our pudding making, check out these older posts from 2010; 2011, and 2012.

I would love to hear what Christmas traditions my readers celebrate. Please drop me a line ... if you're not too busy fulfilling traditions and making memories.

Comments

Sharlene said…
I enjoy your pudding making times. It looks so fun. I loved Granddaughter #2's comment spoken reverently. Children are so fun. Our tradition is baking goodies for neighbours and friends. The list has grown to about about 100 and includes people who haven't been our neighbours for 15 years! We have found that once your start a tradition it has to be continued. I am not sure how we will do it this year, but we will get started baking this week.
Ohtawen said…
It seems like you had such a lovely time with your family. I always love the photos of your adorable granddaughters :)

Eh, we don't have much Christmas traditions in my immediate family, at least not the type your Christmas puddings are :) My parents and I prefer quiet Christmases, spent in reflection or rest. Although, we still try to adhere as much as possible to the Christmas customs in our part of the country.

Here where I live there are a lot of Christmas customs. During the Advent, certain saints are celebrated (St. Nicholas in my town), but the real events are not supposed to start before Christmas Eve Day (i.e. decorating the tree, burning the log, bringing the straw in the house, midnight mass...). Those traditions are lovely and tied to the old ways. I don't have the opportunity of experiencing them fully, but oh well - perhaps some day I will :)

Popular posts from this blog

Adapting Short Row Heels (A Knitting Post)

How Not To Take Family Photos

Advice Needed