Easy-Peasy Soaked Wheat Bread

I've read a lot recently about the value of soaking grains before using. I've been doing it with my oats for a few years now but have only just made the switch to soaking wheat for bread. If what I've read is correct, then wheat and other grains should be soaked, sprouted, or fermented before using if we are to enjoy their full nutritional value.

I love the idea and the taste of sourdough (fermented grain) but I've had little success with my sourdough starter lately. It always seems to turn a nasty looking colour that I suspect signals that it contains bacteria or similar that I'd rather not digest. Plus, it takes time and planning to have a sourdough starter ready when you want it.

Enter soaking.

It requires planning, but only a minimum of 7 hours ahead rather than several days (although you can soak for up to 24 hours).

And it can be done with minimum effort and in a  breadmaking machine. I know bread produced in a breadmaker isn't everyone's idea of perfect bread but sometimes even busy people want to enjoy the benefits of more traditional foods and rather than compromise on ingredients, choose to compromise on method.

Besides, if I had to do this all by hand ALL the time, I'd probably never to it.


There are definitely advantages to using a breadmaker. Let me name a few:
  • No mess. No effort. Well hardly any effort. Measure the ingredients, let the machine mix them to a ball, turn the machine off and let sit for 7-24 hours;
  • It can be all ready to go when you're ready for the next step. The recipe I first tried had the yeast and salt added on top with 1/4 cup flour. I don't do this, preferring to measure these into a small cup and adding when I'm ready to hit Start, but for those who like to use a timer, it is possible to set and forget;
  • If your breadmaker is like mine, the whole wheat/wholemeal cycle begins with a warming period. This is great as it brings the dough and the remaining ingredients (1/4 cup flour, salt and yeast) to the right temperature, and ensures a good loaf.
I'm going to share some recipes below but here are a few tips for adapting any recipe designed for use in a  breadmaker:
  • Place the paddle into the bread pan, then add all the flour except for 1/4 cup, liquid warmed to room temperature, sugar or honey if using, oil or butter if using, and an acid medium;
  • Suitable acid mediums include apple cider vinegar, lemon juice, and cultured dairy. The rule appears to be 1 tablespoon acid medium to every 1 cup liquid. (You may use more but be careful if you choose to use lemon juice as your acid as it can apparently adversely affect the flavour.) You may wish to adjust the amount of liquid in the step above to account for the addition of an acid medium;
  • Allow the machine to just mix the ingredients and then turn off. I use my basic loaf cycle for this and then turn the machine off and unplug (necessary with my machine if I want a different cycle when I turn it back on again);
  • Cover the pan with either oiled plastic wrap or a towel and close the lid of the machine. I had better results when I covered with the plastic wrap as well as closing the lid;
  • Measure the remaining ingredients - 1/4 cup flour that was kept back, salt, yeast - and set aside. I also had a slightly higher loaf with breadmaking yeast rather than active yeast but this may have been because my active yeast was a little old and not so active;
  • After a minimum of 7 hours or maximum 24 hours, add the remaining ingredients to the bread pan and set to whole wheat cycle;
  • It probably pays to check the consistency of the dough when the machine is kneading to ensure it's not too wet or dry. My first two attempts I needed to add a little more flour, but had I not been around when the machine was kneading, I probably still would have ended up with a decent loaf;
  • Once the bread is baked and cooled, enjoy your softer and more nutritious loaf with, hopefully, less tummy discomfort (if you're prone that way).
This recipe for a breadmaker machine was the first one I tried and it worked fine. It worked so fine that I wanted to experiment. When I cut out wheat a few years back, I missed the Speckled Welsh Bread (also known as Raisin Bread) that I used to make.

For obvious reasons (at least to me) I decided to experiment with that recipe first.

I was pleased with the results and considering it was almost all eaten all in one weekend (not by me!), I think I can safely say it was a success.

Then I tried a popular yogurt bread that I've made in the past, and was pleased with the results. Again.

Right now I have another loaf of Speckled Welsh Bread soaking in my breadmaker, so I think it's time I shared these two recipes with my readers.

Speckled Welsh Bread
Into bread pan place 1 cup hot strong tea, 3/4 to 1 cup raisins, sultans, currants, or a mix, 2 tablespoons yogurt, 1 tablespoon olive oil, 1 to 2 tablespoons honey or sugar, and 2-3/4 cup whole wheat flour. Set the machine to mix and turn off and cover once a ball has formed. Into a small bowl place an extra 1/4 cup flour. Make a well on one side and add 1 teaspoon salt. Make a well on other side of flour and add 3 teaspoons breadmaking yeast. Place 1 teaspoon cinnamon and 1 teaspoon mixed spice on top.

After 7-24 hours, add ingredients in cup to top of dough in pan (remember to remove the plastic wrap first) and set machine to whole wheat cycle.

If possible check for degree of wetness/dryness during kneading cycle.

Yogurt Bread
I have several variations of this recipe, so if you have one you've tried and enjoyed, use that. Here's the one I tried using the soaking method:

Into bread pan place 3/4 cup warm water, 1/2 cup yogurt, 2 teaspoons lemon juice, 1 teaspoon olive oil, 2 teaspoons sugar, 2 cups whole wheat flour and 3/4 cup white flour (or more whole wheat if prefer). Set the machine to mix and turn off and cover once a ball has formed. Into a small bowl place extra 1/4 cup flour. Make a well on one side and add 1 teaspoon salt, and on the opposite side another well and add 3 teaspoons breadmaker yeast.

After 7-24 hours, add ingredients in cup to top of dough in pan (remember to remove the plastic wrap first) and set machine to whole wheat cycle.

If possible check for degree of wetness/dryness during kneading cycle.

This bread is also nice with mixed seeds, such as poppy, sesame, sunflower and pumpkin added towards the end of the kneading stage.

If you try either of these recipes I'd love to know how they turn out.

First attempt on left using linked recipe above; second attempt on right using Speckled Welsh Bread recipe.

As for my sourdough starter, I'll keep it for making pikelets or pancakes (when it's not a funky colour).
 

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Adapting Short Row Heels (A Knitting Post)

Thanksgiving